the egg & olive sandwich at brent’s drugs

The best thing to happen to two slices of whole-wheat toast? It’s the Egg & Olive sandwich at Brent’s Drugs in #Fondren. It’s egg salad with chopped green olives mixed in. I order it every time I visit and never regret my choice. Never as in ever.

Egg & Olive Sandwich Brent's Drugs Fondren Jackson Mississippi

Brent’s has been in operation since 1946. Originally opened by pharmacist Alvin Brent, this drugstore was–and still is–a staple gathering place for Jacksonians. Brent’s is now a diner with a lovely soda fountain counter. If you’re super hungry, you can order the E&O with a root beer float on the side. Or milkshake. Nom.

Brents Drugs Fondren Jackson Mississipppi

bon hiver (good winter)

Although winter is my least favorite season (too cold, not enough daylight), I quite enjoy winter in the Deep South. It’s chilly for two weeks and then abracadabra, it feels like spring. What a lovely gift.

This winter has been a good one, I think. My orthopedic surgeon cleared me to walk without a brace, and I’ve greatly enjoyed the freedom. And then THIS.

I have two camellia trees in my backyard, and one of them bloomed much earlier than I expected. January 1, 2019, in fact. Good winter.

1109 pinehurst place

At 1109 Pinehurst Place in #Belhaven sits the home of one of Mississippi’s greatest authors–Eudora Welty (1909—2001). If you visit Jackson, the Welty House and Garden Tour is a must-experience experience. The tour takes about an hour; admission is just $5.

Constructed in 1925, this two-story Tudor Revival is where Miss Welty wrote her most famous works–The Robber Bridegroom, The Optimist’s Daughter, and Delta Wedding in addition to short stories and essays. The house is largely intact as Miss Welty inhabited and left it before passing in 2001. Books and manuscripts are everywhere. There’s even her Smith-Corona typewriter at her desk in her bedroom that overlooks the tree-lined grounds of Belhaven College (now Belhaven University).

Welty House 2

Source: Eudora Welty House and Garden, Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

Photos are not permitted, unfortunately, so you have to commit this house and its garden rooms (containing more than 30 varieties of camellia shrubs and trees) to memory as you move throughout. For those who cannot visit in person, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History offers an online photo tour, which you can experience here.

canopy

Time in my adopted home state of #Mississippi is winding down, and I’ve been spending the last week or so visiting places I love. One thing I will miss very much when I leave Mississippi? All the beautiful trees. From Southern live oak trees to magnolias (so fragrant in the spring) to Georgia pines (so tall), the trees here are magnificent. And plentiful.

In downtown Jackson, there is a stretch of Pascagoula Street that unfurls east of Jefferson in a wonderfully stretchy way. And the trees on this street–some of which are adorned with Spanish moss–create the most lovely canopy. I pulled my car to the side of the street earlier today to capture this beauty. Might have to frame this photo so I can carry a little piece of Mississippi wherever I go.

Canopy

the language of flowers

A year ago the thought of working on the flower beds at my house seemed a daunting proposition. Surely I would screw it up. Surely I couldn’t tell if my efforts were successful. Well I could not be more incorrect. Two months and who knows how many pairs of gardening gloves later, this flower bed/gardening thing is actually a fun adventure. And plants and flowers will tell you pretty quickly if they like their new home. They have their own language, if that makes sense.My backyard is mostly shade so tried a haphazard mix of Boston ferns, hydrangea, impatiens, and ornamental grasses. The impatiens really took off. I water this part of my backyard every morning and am smitten with this hydrangea. So pretty.

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The flower bed in my front yard is a bit more slow going, growth wise. It also gets more sun than the back yard so some of the plants are taking a beating with the heat of central Mississippi. I laid down a bed of pine straw to keep the flowers and plants from scorching and so far, so good. After I water the front yard flower bed, the leaves of the crotons stand upright as if to shout, “Hey thanks! I’ll have some more.”

goodbye, honeysuckle | hello, crepe myrtles

I have a honeysuckle shrub in my back yard and the last 4 weeks have been pretty glorious. Is there a better smell than fresh honeysuckle blossoms? Walking the dogs in #Belhaven amid all of these flowering trees and bushes is such a wonderful experience. I look forward to walking this daily path. Penny and Nickel sniff and wag their tails the whole way. At some point I’ll try to capture it on video.

The honeysuckle flowers are fading fast but the crepe myrtles are in their full regalia. Such showy trees when they are in bloom. The flowers are pale pink, purple, white, red, and watermelon–a hot pink color that is my favorite.

Crepe myrtles

I hope Jacksonians know how lucky they are to live in such lush beauty. I don’t take any of this for granted as a Chicagoan. In fact I marvel at how alive things are here.

Last weekend I purchased some annuals for my backyard deck because, well, annuals. They’re just so colorful. And it was my birthday.

Annuals

I was chatting with one of my neighbors and bemoaned the fact that I would only be able to enjoy them until September. His reply: “WHAT? You’ll be able to enjoy them until November. You’re in the South now.” Word.

reuben v. anderson

One of the things I do for work is create relevant member content, which I sure enjoy. I write magazine articles and social media posts. I also take photos and am a bit of a novice but learning. I found pretty quickly that I need to take anywhere from three to five photos to find one I like.

On Thursday (June 7) we hosted a Fair Housing Event at the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson, and we had the opportunity to learn from Mississippi’s first African American Supreme Court Justice–Reuben V. Anderson. What an amazing man and leader. What a life. In a future biscuit/post, I’ll have to share what I learned.

I buzzed around the event taking as many photos as I was able (while also trying to keep up with social media updates). Here are the ones I like very much.

In this photo, Reuben V. Anderson is at far right. Second from left is Alyce Clarke, and Ms. Clarke is often called the Grand Dame of the Mississippi Legislature. She is the longest serving woman in our state’s legislature, and I’m quite fortunate to have taken her photo.

Deborah McGhee

The other photos are Reuben V. Anderson at the podium and meeting with members. It was an exceptional evening.

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Hands